The 2nd International Workshop Hangzhou 2005

on Simulational Physics

 


Introduction

Organizing Committee

Invited speakers

Titles and abstracts and participants 

Programs
 


Registration

Accommodation and tours

Transportation and conference hall

Visas and maps

Weather and tel. numbers


The 1st International Workshop 2004


Zhejing Institute of Modern Physics

Physics in Zhejiang University

 

 

The 2nd International Workshop Hangzhou 2005

                        on Simulational Physics

December 2 - 4, 2005

Zhejiang University

Hangzhou 310027, China 

This workshop intended to be parallel in nature to the one organized by the Center for Simulational Physics at The University of Georgia in Athens, GA, U.S.A.. The main purpose of this workshop is to stimulate research and cooperation in simulational physics, and related subjects such as computational biology and finance etc. We hope to create an atmosphere for discussion and cooperation in this informal workshop and wish to encourage more researchers to engage in computer simulations.

Topics of interest include Monte Carlo simulation, molecular dynamics and numerical study of physical problems such as materials growth, granular flow, structural and magnetic phase transitions, polymers, surfaces and interfaces, genomics, strongly correlated electron systems, complex network and econophysics.

There will be invited talks (40-60 mins) and contributing talks (20-30 mins). The number of participants is expected to be  about 30. No registration fee will be charged, and a double room costs $24 (200 yuan) per night. Two students may share a double room with two beds. Lunches and a banquet will be offered by the workshop.  Dec. 4 will be for sightseeing.

If you like to present a talk, please give the title and abstract. Graduate student participation is encouraged, and 8 fellowships for students are available for accommodation. Please send the CV and publication list for application. The deadline for receiving the application is Nov. 15.  After the deadline hotel rooms and fellowships are not guaranteed.

 

 

Organizing Committee: 

          K. Binder        (Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz)

          D.P. Landau      (Zhejiang University and University of Georgia)

          B. Zheng         (Zhejiang University, Chairman)

          R. Ziff               (University of Michigan)

 

 For registration, please send an e-mail to:    

  B. Zheng,  bozheng@zju.edu.cn,  Phone: 86 -571 87952753

 

 

Accommodation:

        Rooms in Yuquan hotel are reserved. A double room costs $24 (200 yuan)

   per night. Two students may share a double room with two beds.

   

                On Dec. 1,  after 16:00, a registration desk will be set up in the lobby of Yuquan hotel.

               Participants arriving earlier may directly check-in the hotel first.

 

        Some participants may be arranged in other hotels. In this case,

   messages will be sent to inform you.

 

 

        Yuquan hotel (玉泉饭店)

           杭州市玉古路138
         Tel
:(05718798 2678   operator
         Fax
:(05718799 3340   (销售部)

 

        Jinxi Shangzhuan (金溪山庄)

          杭州市西山路15
        Tel
:(05718799 2288          (operator)
        Fax
:(05718798 0888   (销售部)

      Lily hotel (
百合花饭店)

          杭州市曙光路45
        Tel
:(057187991188  operator
        Fax
:(05718799 1166      (销售部)

      Lingfeng Shangzhuang (
灵峰山庄)

          杭州市玉古路140
        Tel
:(05718797 1456   operator
        Fax
:(05718795 2813 (销售部)
 

      

        Jinxi Shangzhuan (金溪山庄) is in 杨公堤 in West Lake

 

        Other hotels are just around the main gate of Yuquan Campus, Zhejiang Univ.

 

 

Board and tours:

 

        The workshop offers lunches from Dec. 2 - 3, and a banquet in the evening

   of Dec. 2.

        Around the main gate of Yuquan Campus, there is a variety of

   restaurants for dinners. 

             

        There will be a tour to West Lake Dec. 4, and it is free. 

 


 

Transportations:

 

 

1. Arriving at the Pu-Dong airport in Shanghai

       There is a bus connection from the airport to Hangzhou, it costs

   about $12. The last bus departs at 19:30. If someone arrives in the

   the evening of Dec. 1, please inform us and a car or a mini-bus may

   be arranged.

 

2. Arriving at the airport in Hangzhou

       There is a bus connection to Hangzhou, it costs about $2. By taxi,

    it costs about $15.

 

3. Inside Hangzhou, it costs about $1 - $3 to reach anywhere by taxi.

 

4. Bus connections in Hangzhou

  
    K21
路从城站火车站到浙大玉泉校区正门,

       K28路从火车东站到浙大玉泉校区(浙大附中站下车),

       K228路从火车东站到浙大玉泉校区正门。

 

Return tickets:

 

     Anyone who needs a return ticket may ask for help on the registration desk.

 

Conference hall:

 

        The workshop will be held in Zhejiang Institute of Modern Physics. 

        

 

Visas:

      Anyone who needs a letter of invitation for a visa should provide

  a Fax number and a surface-mail address.
 


 

Maps and websites:

 

       Yuquan Campus, Yuquan hotel, Lingfeng Shangzhuang and Lily hotel

    

    Zhejiang University and West Lake

 

    West Lake
 


 

Temperature:

          7 14 degree of centigrade


Useful Tel. numbers:

          Chinese:   L.P. Shan   0571- 8795 3312 (o), 1385 7194 311 (handy)

          English:   B. Zheng    0571- 8795 2753 (o), 1381 9494 123 (handy)

                             T. Xiao                                1358 8750 799 (handy)


Invited  speakers:

       B.   Duenweg       (Max-Plank-Institute for Polymer, Germany)

     X.   Hu            (National Institute for Materials Science, Tokyo)

     N.   Ito           (University of Tokyo)

     B.J. Kim           (Sung-Kyun-Kwan Univ. Korea)

     D.P. Landau        (Zhejiang University and University of Georgia)

     H.   Takayama      (University of Tokyo)  

     S.   Trimper       (Martin-Luther Univ., Germany)

     M.   Widom         (Carnegie-Mellon Univ.)

     R.   Ziff          (University of Michigan)

 

Titles and abstracts

W.J. Bai (F)*       Dept of Chemistry, Univ of Science and Technology of China
Hefei,Anhui, 230026, PR China

     e-mail: wjbai@mail.ustc.edu.cnTel: 13155116842

                    Extremal optimization 
 from self-organized criticality to natural computation 
 
This talk contains three sections. First, the basic concept of extremal
optimization (EO) and its algorithm process are introduced, and a brief review on
its applications for some famous NP-hard discrete optimization problems are given,
including finding the lowest-energy configuration for the Ising spin glass system,
graph partitioning, traveling salesman problem, threecoloring problem, and so on.
Second, the continuous extremal optimization (CEO) algorithm are introduced, which
can be considered as an extension of extremal optimization aiming at continuous
optimization problems. We demonstrate it on a well-known continuous optimization
problem: the Lennard-Jones cluster optimization problem. Third, the method to
enhance CEOs performance by combining EO and some other global optimization
algorithms are introduced. (The content of section 2 has been published in Phys.
Rev. E 72, 016702(2005), and the section 3 will be submitted to Chem. Phys. Lett.)

 

Burkhard  Duenweg   Max-Plank-Inst. for Polymer, Ackermannweg 10,55128 Mainz,Germany;

Associate Editor, Phys. Rev. E

e-mail: duenweg@mpip-mainz.mpg.de

trip: arrival at Hangzhou, Air China 1704, Wed Nov 30, 13:45 
          departure from Guangzhou, Lufthansa 789, Wed Dec 7, 00:30 !!

                    Talk 1: Mesoscopic Simulations for Problems with
                            Hydrodynamics I: Methods

1. Hydrodynamic interactions

2. Long-time tails

3. Brownian Dynamics

4. Dissipative Particle Dynamics

5. Multi-Particle Collision Dynamics

6. Lattice Boltzmann

7. Coupling Lattice Boltzmann $ Molecular Dynamics

                    Talk 2: Mesoscopic Simulations for Problems with 
                            Hydrodynamics II: Application to Soft Matter

                        1. Polymer statics: Random walk, self-avoiding walk, semidilute solutions

2. Polymer dynamics: Rouse model, Zimm model

3. Hydrodynamic screening, incomplete screening

4. Computational challenge

5. Simulations of the dynamics of semidilute polymer solutions

6. Electrophoresis of colloidal suspensions

 

J.Q. Fang           China Institute of Atomic Energy,
P.O.Box 275-81, Beijing, 102413, P.R.China

     e-mail: fangjinqing@gmail.com

                         A Unified Hybrid Preferential Model of Complex Network and
its Universal Properties

Sung Guk Han        (Sung-Kyun-Kwan Univ. Korea)

    e-mail: schwinger@hanmail.net

    trip: arrival at Hangzhou, CA140 Dec 1,14:20
          departure from Hangzhou, CA139, Dec 7, 09:15

                    Reentrant phase transition in the six species predator-prey model
on complex networks

                    We investigate the phase diagram for the six species predator-prey
model in one- and two-dimensional Watts-Strogatz networks. As the
spatial randomness (controlled by therewiring probability $\alpha$) and
the temporal randomness(tuned by the mutation rate $P$) are varied the
systemexhibits the well-defined phase transition at which the defensive
alliance of three species become unstable. In a certain range of $P$,
the phase diagram displays the reentrant behaviors, i.e., the systemis
disordered at small $\alpha$, ordered in the intermediate region, and
then back to disordered state as $\alpha$ is increased further,
indicating that the role of the randomly rewired edges is two-fold
.

D.Y. Hua            Physics Dept, Ningbo Univ, Ningbo 315211,China

     e-mail: huadayin@nbu.edu.cn

                    Non-equilibrium Phase Transition with Absorbing States and
Critical Behavior in Surface Reaction-Diffusion System

Recently, the non-equilibrium phase transition with absorbing states in surface

reaction-diffusion system has attracted much more attention. In this report,

we discuss the effect of the dissociation mechanism of a dimer and the particle

diffusion on the phase transition behavior. It is shown that the dissociation

mechanism of a dimer can change the phase transition behavior in some reaction

systems. When considering the particle diffusion on surface, the structure of the absorbing states can change obviously, it is found that the critical behavior

of the continuous phase transition is changed apparently.

References

1. J. Marro and R. Dickman, Non-equilibrium Phase Transitions in Lattice Models

(Cambridge     Univ. Press, Cambridge, England, 1999).

2.     H. Hinrichsen, Adv. Phys. 49, 815 (2000)

3. G. Odor, Rev. Mod. Phys. 76, 663-724 (2004).

4. R. M. Ziff, E. Gulari and Y. Barshad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 2553 (1986).

5.     V. P. Zhdanov, Surf. Sci. Rep. 45, 231 (2002).

6.     M. Henkel and H. Hinrichsen, J. Phys. A 37, R117-R159 (2004).

X.   Hu       Computational Materials Science Center, 
              National Institute for Materials Science,
              Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba 305-0047, Japan

     e-mail: HU.Xiao@nims.go.jp

     trip:  arrival at Hangzhou Dec 1
            departure from Hangzhou Dec 5 (accommodation arranged by MB Luo)

            Talk I: Density-functional theory for melting phenomena of
                   interlayer Josephson vortex lattice in high-Tc
                   cuprate superconductors

                    Ref: X. Hu, M.B. Luo, and Y.Q. Ma, Phys.Rev.B72,174503(2005).

          Talk II: Room-temperature ferrimagnetism and half-metallic property 
                   in a new class of perovskite cuprates

                   Refs: X.G. Wan, M. Kohno and X. Hu, Phys.Rev.Lett.94,087205(2005)
                                                       Phys.Rev.Lett.95,146602(2005)

 

Nobuyasu  Ito       Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering, 
                    The University of Tokyo,  Tokyo 113-8656,  JAPAN

     e-mail: ito@ap.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp

     trip: arrival at Hangzhou, NH929Nov 30, 12:50
           departure from Hangzhou, NH930, Dec 7, 13:50                  

                       Talk 1: Evolution of ecosystem with size-free model

We proposed an evolutional dynamical model of ecosystem named the "size-free model",

where new species appear and extinct. Instead of the standard quadratic inter-species

interaction, $x_i \cdot x_j$, assumed in Lotka-Volterraand predator-prey models,

the size-free model fractional has interaction terms of the form of

$x_i^{1-\lambda} \cdot x_j^\lambda$. With computer simulation analysis, it is shown

that this model reproduces food-web networks as complex as ones we observe in nature,

and life-time distribution of species estimated from fossils. There are two phases

in the size-free model: steady phase and diversifing phase. In the steady phase, number

of species reaches to steady values and fluctuate around it. In the diversifing phase,

it continues to increase in time.

References:

 T. Shimada, S. Yukawa and N. Ito, "Self-Organization in an ecosystem",

                                     Artificial Life and Robotics, vol.6 (2002) p.78

 T. Shimada, S. Yukawa and N. Ito, "Life-span of families in fossil data forms q-exponential

                                     distribution", Intern. J. Mod. Phys. C14 (2003) p.1267

 Y. Murase, T. Shimada, S. Yukawa and N. Ito, "The behavioral adaptation and the

                                     diversification in ecosystem", in preparation.

 

                        Talk 2: Cluster-cluster aggregation of 
                                2D Ising-type dipole particles

Recent experimental studies are reporting interesting pattern formation and aggregation

process in the Ising-type dipole system, where the dipole direction is limited only

to up and down just like the Ising spin. In this talk, our simulational results are shown.

Our experimental simulation using floating magnet on water reproduces characteristic

clustering of particles and its dynamics are analyzed by computer simulation. The dominant

process turns out to be cluster-cluster aggregation, and clusters with odd number of

particles are dominant.

References:

I. Varga, H. Yamada, F. Kun, H.-G. Matuttis and N. Ito, "Structure formation in a binary

   monolayer of dipolar particles", Phys. Rev. E71 (2005) 051405

N. Yoshioka, I. Varga, F. Kun, S. Yukawa and N. Ito, "Attraction-limited cluster-cluster

 aggregation of Ising dipolar paticles", to appear in Phys. Rev. E.

Beom Jun Kim      Department of Physics,Sung-Kyun-Kwan University, 
                  440-746 Suwon, Korea 

     e-mail: beomjun@skku.edu
       Tel: (+82)31-299-4541
       Fax: (+82)31-290-7055

     trip: arrival at Hangzhou, CA140 Dec 1,14:20
departure from Guangzhou, CA139, Dec 7, 09:15 

                        Network Marketing on a Small-World Network

We investigate a dynamic model of network marketing in a small-world network
structure artificially constructed similarly to the Watts-Strogatz network model.
Different from the traditional marketing, consumers can also play the role of the
manufacturer's selling agents in network marketing, which is stimulated by the
referral fee the manufacturer offers. As the wiring probability $\alpha$ is
increased from zero to unity, the network changes from the one-dimensional regular
directed network to the star network where all but one player are connected to one
consumer. The price $p$ of the product and the referral fee $r$ are used as free
parameters to maximize the profit of the manufacturer. It is observed that at
$\alpha=0$ the maximized profit is constant independent of the network size $N$
while at $\alpha \neq 0$,it increases linearly with $N$. This is in parallel to
the small-world transition.It is also revealed that while the optimal value of
$p$ stays at an almost constant level in a broad range of $\alpha$, that of $r$
is sensitive to a change in the network structure. The consumer surplus is also
studied and discussed.

David P. Landau     Center for Simulational Physics, Univ. of G eorgia, Athens, GA 30602, U.S.

     e-mail: dlandau@hal.physast.uga.edu

       trip: arrival at Shanghai, Flight NW 25, Nov 30, 8:20PM
             departure from Hongkong,  Dec 13 

                         Do Spin-Waves Exist in Iron above T_c?

Manabu   Machida   Inst of Industrial Science, Univ of Tokyo,
Tokyo 153-8505, Japan

     e-mail: machida@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    trip: arrival at Hangzhou, CA1706 Dec 1, 17:55
          departure from Hangzhou, CA1704, Dec 4, 13:10

                         Numerical simulation of the temperature dependence
of the ESR intensity of the nanomagnet V15

Hajime   Takayama   Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo
                    Kashiwa-no-ha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581, Japan

     e-mail:
  takayama@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp
     Tel&Fax: +81-4-7136-3440

     trip: arrival at Hangzhou, CA 1706,Dec 1,17:55  
           departure from Hangzhou, JL 636,Dec 5, 13:15

Numerical Experiments on Some Spin Systems

   Most of numerical simulations so far carried out have been aimed 
to confirm (or disprove) an existing theoretical prediction or an
interpretation of experimental results, as well as to extract some 
quantitative results such as values of critical exponents of a 
certain phase transition, which are hardly possible by analytical 
studies. More interesting features of numerical simulations are, 
I think, to find numerically new physical phenomena or/and concepts 
based on a well-defined microscopic Hamiltonian. These I call 
'numerical experiments'. In this talk, I'll discuss such numerical 
experiments we have recently carried out. One is on the quasi-1D 
(2D) antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model, for which we have found a 
universal relation between the Neel temperature and the interchain 
(interlayer) coupling strength by the quantum Monte Calro 
simulation [1]. Another is on a magnetic dipole-moment system on a 
finite-sized cubic lattice, in which we have found a peculiar 
`from-Edge-to-Interior' spin freezing process by the molecular 
dynamics simulation [2]. If a time is allowed, I'll talk about 
a standard Monte Carlo simulation on an Ising spin glass, which 
sheds a light on a long-standing problem in the spin-glass study, 
namely, whether the spin-glass phase is stable or not under a 
uniform magnetic field [3]. 

1] C. Yasuda et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 217201.
2] K. Matsushita et al, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 74 (2005) 2651.
3] H. Takayama and K. Hukushima, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 73 (2004) 2077
 

 

Steffen   Trimper   Physics Department, Martin-Luther Univ.,
                    06099 Halle, Germany

     e-mail: trimper@physik.uni-halle.de

     trip: arrival at Hangzhou, FM 9152, Dec 1, 15:35,
departure from Guangzhou, CA 1310, Dec 7, 08:35

                        Talk 1: Thin ferroelectric films

                        Talk 2: Let's have a party

                        Talk 3: Models with feedback

X.   Wan       Zhejiang Institute of Modern Physics, Zhejiang University
               Hangzhou, 310027, P.R. China

     e-mail: xinwan@zimp.zju.edu.cn

                   Modeling Disordered Systems with Broad Energy Scales

              Models with quenched disorder sometimes have intrinsic broad
        energy distributions. Such distributions may also emerge within
        various renormalization group schemes. While low-temperature physics may
        be interesting, crossover behavior can also be very rich. We use a simple
        model of diluted magnetic semiconductors to illustrate an unusual ordered
        phase and the effects of disorder on the phase. Difficulties in
        simulations arise at low temperatures due to the quantum nature of spins.
        We also discuss the crossover behavior of a related random spin model,
        which the conventional real-space renormalization group method fails to
        capture.

Michael   Widom    Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 
                   Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA

     e-mail: widom@andrew.cmu.edu

     trip: arrival at Shanghai, United Airlines 835, Nov 30,5:15pm
           departure from Shanghai, United Airlines 836, Dec 05,7:20pm
 
                    First principles at finite temperature: 
                      merging quantum and classical approaches
 
              Advances in quantum mechanical electronic density 
        functional theory enable accurate first principles total energy 
        calculations for surprisingly complex structures. We wish to 
        exploit this newly available information to understand the 
        structure, stability and properties of interesting compounds. 
        Statistical mechanics, rather than quantum mechanics is needed 
        to meet this challenge. This talk describes a few approaches, 
        including the use of transfer matrices, Monte Carlo simulation 
        and classical liquid density functional theory to model the 
        stability of metal alloys. Particular attention is paid to 
        explaining the stability of high temperature phases that 
        decompose into lower energy structures at low temperatures. 
        Examples are given in alloy systems where quasicrystals are observed.
         
 
Robert   Ziff       Dept. of Chemical Engineering, H. H. Dow Building,
2300 Hayward Str, Univ of Michigan, 
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136
 
Associate Editor, Phys. Rev. E

     e-mail: rziff@engin.umich.edu

     trip: arrival at Shanghai, Flight NW 25, Nov 30, 8:20PM
           departure from Guangzhou, Flight NW 10, Dec 7, 8:30AM !

                 Talk 1: Methods of finding the critical threshold in percolation

              In this talk we will discuss ways of finding the critical threshold
         in percolation, both exactly and numerically.  The exact results
         are restricted to 2d, and are all essentially related to the star-triangle
         transformation and duality.  Here we show how the star-triangle
         transformation can be generalized to yield the exact thresholds
         to a large class of lattices.  We also introduce some non-regular
         lattices with exact thresholds.  For other lattices in 2d, and all
         lattices in higher dimensions, numerical methods are needed.
         Here we describe several of them, including the hull-gradient
         method (2d only), the Newman-Ziff method, the Hoshen-Kopelman
         method, and the single-cluster (Leith) method.  Many suggested
         problems will be presented.

                  Talk 2: Publishing in Physical Review E.              

             Physical Review E receives roughly 4000 papers
         a year for publication, and accepts 50-60% of them.
         It sends out over 14,000 referrals to referees in a database
         containing more that 10,000 people.  In this talk, I will describe
         the editorial process in more detail, and give suggestions
         for improving the chances that your papers will be accepted,
         with special pointers for non-native English writers.
 
                 Talk3 (in Guangzhou):
                       The enclosed-area size distribution in percolation
 
             The usual form of the size distribution in percolation,
         n_s = the number of clusters of size s, can be written in a
         universal form in the scaling limit, but that form contains two
         metric factors that vary from lattice to lattice.  Here we show
         that the distribution can in fact be written in an entirely
         universal form by considering the enclosed area distribution --
         that is, the number of clusters whose enclosed area
         is greater than A.  For all 2d systems at criticality, this quantity
         equals C/A, where C = 1/(8 pi sqrt(3)).  Away from the critical
         point, the scaling function looks to be purely exponential.
         Besides enclosed area, other measures of the area can be
         used (area of disc covering cluster, etc.), resulting in a different
         value of the constant C.  In higher dimensions, if one considers
         the volume of a sphere or other shape covering the cluster,
         this also leads to a universal form of the size distribution.
 
 
Tao Zhou*     Dept. of Modern Physics, Univ. of Science and Technology of China, 
              Hefei Anhui, 230026, PR China
 
    e-mail: zhutou@ustc.edu
 
                      Traffic Dynamics on Complex Networks
 

 

              We propose a simple model for traffic dynamics on networks. 
        For both homogeneous and heterogeneous networks, there exists a phase 
        transition from free phase to congested phase. The value of the transition 
        point can be considered as a measure of network's communication ability, 
        which is significantly affected by the topology of the network. 
        Based on this model and under the case that the global information is 
        available, we propose a new routing strategy to improve the transportation  
        efficiency on scale-free networks. Instead of using the routing strategy for  
        shortest path, we give a generalized routing algorithm to find the so-called 
        efficient path, which considers the possible congestion in the nodes 
        along actual paths. Since the nodes with largest degree are very susceptible 
        to traffic congestion, an effective way to improve traffic and control 
        congestion, as our new strategy, can be as redistributing traffic load 
        in central nodes to other non-central nodes. Simulation results indicate 
        that the network capability in processing traffic is improved more than 
        10 times by optimizing the efficient path, which is in good agreement
        with the analysis. We also investigated the case when only local information 
        is available, and found that the capacity of the network can be enhanced by 
        increasing the forwarding ability of small important nodes which bear severe 
        congestion.

 
 
 
Rui Li (F) *           Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology
 
    e-mail: liruilr@263.net
 
Tian-Yi Cai (F) *      Physics Department, Suzhou University,
                       Suzhou, Jiangsu  215006, China  
            
    e-mail: 110308002@suda.edu.cn
 
Qiulon Lu              Physics Department, Suzhou University,
                       Suzhou, Jiangsu  215006, China 
 
 
何舢(男)*             Shanghai Jiao Tong University
e-mail: hsstudio@msn.com 
陈焕阳(男)
e-mail: moroshine@sjtu.edu.cn 
杨明成(男)
e-mail: ymch5010@sjtu.edu.cn 
景俊
e-mail: jingjun@sjtu.edu.cn 
杨涛*

e-mail: yang_tao@sjtu.edu.cn

 

徐骏
e-mail: xujuna0307291@sjtu.edu.cn 
连增菊
e-mail: lzju1980@sjtu.edu.cn 
陈佳
e-mail: zhjnbchj@163.com
 
Prof. Peiqing Tong         Nanjing Normal Univ, Nanjing
 
       e-mail: pqtong@pine.njnu.edu.cn              
 
Zhiyong Wang*       Nanjing Normal Univ, Nanjing
 
      e-mail: wzynjnu@163.com
 
Jie Sun                    Shanghai Jiao Tong University
 
   e-mail: riosun@gmail.com 
 

Z.B. Li          Zhongshan Univ., China

   e-mail: stslzb@zsu.edu.cn
 
Prof. Yuejin Zhu            Physics Department, Ningbo University
 
Prof. Bingzhen Xu           Physics Department, Ningbo University
 
      e-mail: huadayin@nbu.edu.cn
 
Ting Chen (F) *             Physics Department, Ningbo University
a student                   Physics Department, Ningbo University
 
e-mail: huadayin@nbu.edu.cn

Dr. Haihua Pan         Chemistry Department, Zhejiang University

    e-mail: panhh@zju.edu.cn  

  

Dr. John Peter         Zhejiang University

    e-mail: jpeter@hbar.zju.edu.cn

Junwen Mao 

    e-mail: jwmao@zimp.zju.edu.cn

Peng Zhang             

     e-mail: antzhp@yahoo.com.cn

Yuyu Zhang  

     e-mail: yuyuzhang111@163.com

Huan Liu  

     e-mail: sdphylh@163.com

Weiping Cao

     e-mail: caoweiping2000@126.com

Zhihua Yang

     e-mail: yzh_0911@163.com

Shuxiang Yang 

     e-mail: qudemon@yahoo.com.cn

Qingmiao Nie

     e-mail: qingmiaonie@yahoo.com

Chao Wang 

   e-mail: chaowang0606@126.com

Hongwei Fang

   e-mail: hwf@zimp.zju.edu.cn

 

Bingwei Li

   e-mail: bwellleestudent@sina.com

Wenqiang Chen

   e-mail: xiaoyicong@163.com

Xiaoyan Weng

   e-mail: abbywmail@sina.com

 

Shi-zeng Lin           Zhejiang University

Jianqing Du

Xiao Ting      

Xia-ming Zhu

Asad Ahmed

 

Hong-hui Ding          Zhejiang University

Chunyun Huang     

Bin Jiang

Fengping Jin   

 

Li-xin Zhong

Fei Ren

Tian Qiu

Jie Shen

 

 

   

 

Programs

 

Pre-workshop

                           December 1

Chairman        B. Zheng             Zhejiang University, China  

19:00 - 19:30   X. Hu            National Inst. for Materials Science, Japan

                Room-temperature ferrimagnetism and half-metallic property 
                in a new class of perovskite cuprates

19:30 - 20:00   N. Ito           University of Tokyo

                Evolution of ecosystem with size-free model

20:00 - 20:30   S. Trimper       Martin-Luther Univ.,Germany

                Let's have a party

20:30 - 21:00   R. Ziff          Univ of Michigan

                Publishing in Physical Review E

 

Workshop

                        December  2

07:00 - 08:00   Breakfast

 

 

08:30 - 08:40   B. Zheng

 

                                Welcome speech 

 

Chairman        D.P. Landau             Zhejiang University, China

 

08:40 - 09:30   B. Duenweg       Max-Plank-Inst.for Polymer, Germany

 

                Mesoscopic Simulations for Problems 
             with Hydrodynamics I:  Methods

 

09:30 - 09:40   Discussion

 

09:40 - 10:30   M. Widom         Carnegie Mellon University

 

                First principles at finite temperature:

                merging quantum and classical approaches

 

10:30 - 10:40   Discussion

 

10:40 - 11:00   Tea Break

 

 

11:00 - 11:50   X. Hu            National Inst. for Materials Science, Japan

 

                   Density-functional theory for melting phenomena of
                interlayer Josephson vortex lattice in high-Tc
                cuprate superconductors

11:50 - 12:00   Discussion

 

12:00 - 13:30   Lunch in the conference hall

 

Chairman        R. Ziff          Univ. Michigan 

14.00 - 14:50   B. Duenweg       Max-Plank-Inst.for Polymer, Germany

               Mesoscopic Simulations for Problems 
                with Hydrodynamics II: Application to Soft Matter

14:50 - 15:00   Discussion

15:00 - 15:40   N. Ito           University of Tokyo

               Cluster-cluster aggregation of 2D Ising-type dipole particles

15:40 - 15:50   Discussion

15:50 - 16:00   Tea break

16:00 - 16:30   X. Wan           Zhejiang University

                Modeling Disordered Systems with Broad Energy Scales

16:30 - 17:00   M. Machida       University of Tokyo

                Numerical simulation of the temperature dependence
                of the ESR intensity of the nanomagnet V15

17:00 - 17:30   W.J. Bai         Univ of Science and Technology of China

                Extremal optimization 
                -- from self-organized criticality to natural computation 

 

18:00 - 20:00   Banquet in Lily hotel

 

                            December 3

 

Chairman        N.Ito                       University of Tokyo

08:30 - 09:20   H. Takayama      University of Tokyo

                Numerical Experiments on Some Spin Systems

09:20 - 09:30   Dicussion

09:30 - 10:00   S Trimper        Martin-Luther Univ.,Germany

                Thin ferroelectric films

10:00 - 10:10   Dicussion

10:10 - 10:20   Tea break

10:20 - 11:00   B.J. Kim         Sung-Kyun-Kwan University, Korea 

                Network Marketing on a Small-World Network

11:00 - 11:10   Discussion

11:10 - 11:30   S.G. Han         Sung-Kyun-Kwan University, Korea

                Reentrant phase transition in the six species 
                predator-prey model on complex networks

11:30 - 12:00   T. Zhou          Univ of Science and Technology of China

                Traffic Dynamics on Complex Networks

 

12:00 - 13:30   Lunch in the conference hall

 

Chairman        B. Duenweg       Max-Plank-Inst.for Polymer, Germany

14:00 - 14:50   R. Ziff          Univ of Michigan ,

                Methods of finding the critical threshold in percolation

14:50 - 15:00   Discussion

15:00 - 15:30   D.Y. Hua         Ningbo Univ, China

                Non-equilibrium Phase Transition with Absorbing States and
                Critical Behavior in Surface Reaction-Diffusion System

15:30 - 15:50   Tea break

15:50 - 16:40   D.P. Landau       University of Georgia

                Do Spin-Waves Exist in Iron above T_c?

16:40 - 16:50   Discussion

16:50 - 17:30   H.P. Ying and B. Zheng          Zhejiang University

17:30 -         D.P. Landau       closing speech

 

                           December  4

Tour to West Lake

 

Post-workshop in Zhongshan Univ., Guangzhou

Chairman        Z.B. Li           Zhongshan Univ., Guangzhou

14:00 - 17:30

D.P. Landau     

                A New Approach to Monte Carlo Simulations in Statistical Physics
                and Beyond

B. Duenweg               

                Electrostatics via the Maxwell equations
 
R. Ziff
 
                The enclosed-area size distribution in percolation
 
N. Ito
 
                The Avogadoro Challenge
 
S. Trimper
 
                Thin ferroelectric films
 
B.J. Kim

B. Zheng

                Econophysics -- Leverage and anti-leverage effects